About our project



Our goal was to create an E. coli strain, which inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation in wounds by producing RNA III-inhibiting-peptide (RIP).

S. aureus is one of the largest causes of hospital infections, each year infecting millions of people around the globe. S. aureus is normally commensal, but can create bacterial biofilms on implanted medical devices and in post-operational wounds. Biofilm is becoming increasingly hard to treat, as a result of growing resistance to many types of antibiotics.

By manipulating E. coli to express the synthetic RIP peptide, we have reached this goal. RIP has been shown to hinder the quorum-sensing processes essential for biofilm development in S. aureus, making it harder for the bacteria to spread, and at the same time, improving the chance that conventional antibiotics will work.

We propose making a bandage that contains our engineered bacteria behind a semipermeable membrane, allowing only small peptides such as RIP to pass through, into the wound. We hope to show that biological machines can be used to fight different kinds of bacterial infections intelligently, to contribute with our RIP and export-signal parts and by better characterization of the older parts we've used.

Our Project | Background for the project

About our team

University of Southern Denmark

SDU Denmark. From left to right: Julius, Marc, Helle, Kir, John and Anne.

We are eight students from the University of Southern Denmark, who shared a common wish to explore synthetic biology and decided to start the first iGEM team at our university.

We are from diverse backgrounds such as nano-bio-science, molecular biology and medicine.

Together with six advisors, we've spend the summer getting to grips with the up’s and down’s in synthetic biology, the lab, how to organize the project and everything in between.

Our Team | See what we're up to on our blog

What do you think?


We would love to get as much feedback as possible, both on our project and other work as well. Feel free to write, criticize or just say hallo.

Our project in 1 minute


We want to fight hospital infections, using a biological machine.

For this purpose we have constructed a recombinant E. coli, which produces the RIP peptide. RIP inhibits biofilm formation in the bacteria S. aureus.

This peptide will make it easier to fight infections and kill S. aureus with conventional antibiotics.


Oct. 21: Last minute panic updates are on the way :-) Expect some turbulence on the page for now.

Oct. 20: Brainstorm and team page updated.

Oct. 19: We made a sacrifice to the Gods. Hopefully this will gives us the last bit of luck for the competition.

Oct. 18: We've been working hard on characterizing our parts and now we're getting ready for the final wiki upgrade

Oct. 16: We now have a couple on the team - Helle and Mike <3 congratulations! (Anne and Marc have actually been a couple for 4 years Anna)

Oct. 10: Colony-PCR protocol is uploaded.


Oct. 3: Yes! We got a gold medal in Valencia's survery.

Oct. 1: Congratulation Anne! Happy Birthday.

Sep. 22: A lot of new info on the background page.

Sep. 16: We're featured in this months Perspektiv & Mening, a magazine at SDU.

Sep. 10: We got our 4-brick-part together. Wohu. Now we can start testing.

Aug. 26: Loading buffer on trail at our blog. And we are getting ready to insert our different bricks into a backbone, yeah.

Aug. 25: More profiles on our team page.

Aug. 20: We updated the team page with most of our advisors.

Aug. 19: Wohu! Anna has returned after a five week trip to Africa where she helped deliver babies in Kenya. Good to have you back! Also we wrote about our ligation troubles on our blog.

Aug. 17: We updated the wiki with more protocols, our diary and changed the layout a bit.

Aug. 14: Julius left us to study at University of North Carolina. We miss you already, Mr. Misty Forrest Dragon!

Aug. 11: Kir's birthday! Happy birthday!

Check out the other teams

Be sure to check out all the other teams that are competing in this years iGEM.